The Top 50 Greatest All-Time Kansas City Royals from 50 Years of Royals Baseball. By Jason Dannelly

porter-kc

The Greatest Pair of Glasses Ever for KC.

Over the past week I’ve been nursing my post-football/pre-baseball sickness that seems to creep in every year at this time. The only cure is to scour the internet for spring baseball statistics, check up on the top prospects and remind yourself of everything forgotten about the last baseball season.

Then it happened. I went to the Kansas City Royals web site. It was right there. . .mocking me.

“The Top 50 Greatest All-Time Kansas City Royals from 50 Years of Royals Baseball.”

I did what I shouldn’t have. . .I clicked the link and No. 50 came up. . .Jarrod Dyson.

Yes, that Jarrod Dyson.

After my computer finished crashing and I stopped swearing at it and the list, I made a decision. I’m coming up with my own “Top 50 Greatest Royals from the First 50 Years.” After all, if you start the list with Jarrod Dyson it’s going to be a flawed list. That’s nothing against Dyson and his time in blue but to even mention him as one of the top Royals of all-time means that you literally started watching Royals baseball in 2014 and stopped halfway through 2016 when they weren’t doing so well.

I completely understand that no “all-time team” will ever be written without criticism. I’m sure this one will be torn apart.

I also understand that the Royals web site list was voted on by the fans which confirms my fear of the bandwagoners leading the voice of the Royals fans now and not the ones who actually watched and paid attention when they were losing 100 plus games a year with Runelvys Hernandez trotting out to the mound as the next big thing. (Note: He didn’t make the list.) Continue reading

Jason Dannelly: How I Became and Remain a Lifelong Fan of the Kansas City Royals.

1979740_10153939200825244_1876213376_n

The Dave Dannelly Family

A couple years ago I was in Kentucky covering an NAIA football game. The Yankees and the Red Sox were locked up in their first postseason skirmish that would later result in the Red Sox coming back from behind in the series and eventually moving on to win their first World Series since 1918.

During the course of that night one Athletic Director was pretty frustrated. Somehow, he was an avid Yankees fan and was taking every pitch personally that night. At one point I thought I was going to have to drive him home because he was so inconsolable after the loss.

Innocently I asked, “How are you, an AD in Kentucky, a fan of the Yankees?”

His reply, “Because I like winners and the Yankees have always been winners. Who do you like?”

“The Royals.” Continue reading